Individuals and Societies  : History

blueline

Internal Assessment

by Levi on Fri Aug 06, 2004 6:38 am

This is designed as a basic introduction to the Internal Assessment - feel free to add further advice, or ask questions. My basic guidelines are as follows:

1. Topic. Your topic is less important for history than in is, say, in English. Often it is best to start with a very general idea, then narrow this down to a precise topic. Also, be ready to change title if this seems sensible. I went from studying how Tito broke ties with Stalin in 1948, to an investigation of why this happened, as it seemed to be both a more engaging topic, and a more easy one to tackle given the literature which I had available. Some people like to work on a topic related to their examined material, thus gaining a greater insight into the field. This has much to commend it, but it is not the only profitable approach. I was sick to death of studying Hitler, Stalin, Mussolini etc. by the begining of my second year, so I decided to look at Tito as a break from the norm. As it happened I got really into my research and probably did a better essay because of this. Basically do whatever you think you can write best on, and will have the most fun writing on (if these two are different try to find a compromise).

2. Research. Research is the most important part of the essay. The best way to impress an examiner is to show a deep knowledge of your subject, and the historiography behind it. Look at a combination of books and articles if possible, and do plenty of reading before even placing pen to paper. Once you have read around the topic and decided exactly what you want to write on, then begin drafting.

3. Structure. Follow the structure as set out in the criteria slavishly. You need to jump through the hoops set out in the criteria - organising your essay this way is the best manner to ensure that you cover all criteria, and it is also the best way to showcase how comprehensively you have followed said criteria to the examiner.

Levi

Location: Cambridge


by Guest on Thu Sep 09, 2004 1:22 am

I also think that it is good to use at least 1-2 primary sources. They can be vry easily evaluated and give a lot of information

Guest


by Levi on Sun Sep 12, 2004 2:03 pm

Anonymous wrote:

I also think that it is good to use at least 1-2 primary sources. They can be vry easily evaluated and give a lot of information

True, but this is not required. I didn't use any primary sources - just referenced a few through the secondary literature.

Levi

Location: Cambridge


by guest in trouble on Mon Jun 13, 2005 11:45 pm

i cannot stay under the limit no matter what i do !!! i am still 82 damn words over the limit!!!

they gave us exemplars (this was in some special teacher's guide) and i was so desperate i did an estimated word count and the exemplar was over the limit!!! it was a fake word count and they got 20/20!! what the hell am i supposed to do !!

please help !!

OK, i have omitted the following from the count in my desperation:

what more can i do ???

will i lose marks for having 2082 words??!!!

please respond soon!!! like in 2 days !!!

guest in trouble


by marie on Tue Jun 14, 2005 9:46 pm

guest in trouble wrote:

i cannot stay under the limit no matter what i do !!! i am still 82 damn words over the limit!!!

they gave us exemplars (this was in some special teacher's guide) and i was so desperate i did an estimated word count and the exemplar was over the limit!!! it was a fake word count and they got 20/20!! what the hell am i supposed to do !! please help !!

OK, i have omitted the following from the count in my desperation:

My harvard references My titles in section C, the names of my two sources in section A, the question

what more can i do ???

will i lose marks for having 2082 words??!!!

please respond soon!!! like in 2 days !!!

DON'T PANIC!!!!

I think you're allowed up to 100 words under or over the word limit!

And in the future, even if you do FUDGE IT - they never, ever know unless you're like 2500 words or 1500 etc.

marie

Location: Cambridge, UK

blueline

Introduction to IB History

by Levi on Fri Aug 06, 2004 5:49 am

I'm afraid it may take me a while to get around to setting up all the stickies I want regarding IB History, but I thought I might as well get the forum strated by introducing myself and making a few general remarks (i.e. waffling) about IB History.

I studied History HL (Paper 3 on History of Africa) at the International School of Tanganyika, in Dar es Salaam Tanzania, from 2001-3. Since then I have gone on the study Anglo-Saxon Norse and Celtic (essentiall a mediaeval studies course) at Cambridge University. My knowledge of exact criteria and syllabus points is probably a bit dated and sketchy, but I have benefited from a year's further study in history and literature.

Basically the IB history course is about learning to treat history and historiography analytically. Many people going into it from GCSE and IGCSE might find bits of this a shock to the system - I know I noticed that suddenly a might deeper level of analysis was required! Don't worry, as everyone feels this way - within two years time you will look back and cringe at your old GCSE essays.

Analysis is difficult to explain and teach. The most important way to approach the course it to read widely, looking for divergent view points, and examining their strengths and weaknesses. Where possible check these historical interpretations against primarily source material. The more you can deal with a combination of primary and secondary material in a seamless fashion the closer you get to writing 'real history'. However, this said, if you study Nazi Germany, Stalinist Russia or other such common topics, chances of you being able to sift through the mountains of primarily source material are low indeed (it would be a waste of time as a matter of fact). In these cases just look at the ocassional important speech or memorandum, and for the rest rely on the nice and neat overviews provided by McCauley and those of his ilk.

Ultimately IB history should be a fun experience. Try to engage your teacher and fellow students in discussions, debates and arguments. Get passionate. This is the sort of approach the will lead to lifelong success in history, even if it will not guarantee a 7.

Levi

Location: Cambridge

blueline

Syllabus

by Froydis on Fri Feb 02, 2007 7:39 pm

This is probably gonna sound wierd, but we never got a syllabus for US/World History. Is there anyone out there who has one, or a list of topics that need to be covered and can send it to me that would be amazing! Thanks

Froydis 

blueline

History Essay on Russia

by ahbö on Fri Feb 10, 2006 3:50 am

Oi!

Any of you snobs have a really good essay on the Bolsheviks triumph during 1917 and 1921????? Now if you do please send it to me.

Anyway thanks a lot for the help and I hope i get something out of this!!

Cheerio

ahbö

blueline

Have a Timeline To Share?

by marie on Mon Mar 21, 2005 11:29 am

If any of you out there have a timeline to share with everyone it would be great if you could post them here!

marie

Location: Cambridge, UK

blueline

History Trivia Thread

by marie on Wed Aug 25, 2004 10:11 am

Is it just me or doesn't knowing trivial facts in History help you remember things better? It allows you to make links with vital facts. OK, here are some I know that sort of connect with what you study in the IB.

Trotsky was murdered with an icepick in 1940

There is a bald-hair pattern within the Russian leaders. As follows:

Lenin: bald. Stalin: hair, Krushchev: bold, Brezhnev: hair

Andropov: bald, Chernenko: hair, Gorbachev: bald, Yeltsin: hair, Putin: Bald

OK not that many for 20th century history, but hey, I didn't do that well in history. I'm hoping all the history experts out there *cough* Levi and Rasmoose *cough* will help me out.

marie

Location: Cambridge, UK


by Levi on Thu Aug 26, 2004 2:35 am

marie wrote:

Krushchev: bold.

Levi

Location: Cambridge


by marie on Thu Aug 26, 2004 11:29 am

Levi wrote:

marie wrote:

Krushchev: bold.

Waaaaaaa I'll change that, haha. There is some truth embedded in that...perhaps?

Hahaha.

marie

Location: Cambridge, UK


by Levi on Fri Aug 27, 2004 3:22 am

A Freudian slip perhaps...

Levi

Location: Cambridge