Discussion  : General Chat

blueline

Meet and Greet

by Levi on 09 Aug 2004 01:52 am

I thought, especially since most he people on the site right now are mods, that some introductions might be in order. I might as well begin with myself.

I can't think of anything else to add at the moment, but if anyone else thinks there are other areas that should be included either PM me, or just add them when you put up your own information, and I shall then edit my post accordingly.

Levi

Location: Cambridge


by marie on 09 Aug 2004 06:12 pm

I'm the webmaster btw. If you have any questions feel free to PM or e-mail me whenever you like.

To students currently taking IB: I must say that when I started the IB I wasn't the strongest student. I literally only achieved Bs on my IGCSEs and I was just about to drop off the Merit Roll. If you read the first in-class essay I wrote in English class it is very embarrasing. I think on the first pop-quiz in math I got a C. However if you try hard, and are consistent with your work you improve tremendously. You don't have to be a genius to achieve over a 40.

Don't worry and hang in there!

marie

Location: Cambridge, UK


by ash2003 on 25 Aug 2004 01:41 pm

It's hard to follow onto these two geniuses, but here I go:

ps. I might be pessimistic here but getting 40+ on the IB is not that easy! If I'm not mistaken it's something like that top 3% of IB students that acheive scores of 40+. But as Marie says, it's not impossible. With the right attitude and the right help (ibhelp.com), getting 40+ is not a dream.

ash2003

Location: Yokohama yo' mamma


by Linda on 26 Aug 2004 03:47 pm

ToK was my favorite subject and I'm currently having fun making the ToK Moodle on this site, be sure to drop by!

PS! If you don't want to enrol you can visit as a guest using the key "tortoise".

Linda

Location: Warwick Uni


by Nowakowski on 27 Aug 2004 04:57 am

Allo! Salut!

What can I say? Good luck to all who are doing the IB! ;p

Nowakowski

Location: Edinburgh (Uni) / Poland Gdansk


by Descartes Demon on 11 Oct 2004 04:13 am

.. attended the infamous Berg Videregående Skole in Oslo, Norway

What do you mean by infamous?????

Descartes Demon


by Linda on 04 Nov 2004 05:52 am

Descartes Demon wrote:

.. attended the infamous Berg Videregående Skole in Oslo, Norway

What do you mean by infamous?????

as anyone privy to the workings of Berg would know - it sucks.

Linda

Location: Warwick Uni


by Descartes Demon on 11 Nov 2004 06:18 am

Linda wrote:

Descartes Demon wrote:

.. attended the infamous Berg Videregående Skole in Oslo, Norway

What do you mean by infamous?????

as anyone privy to the workings of Berg would know - it sucks.

I know a few people who go there, what is so bad about the place?

Descartes Demon


by Linda on 12 Nov 2004 06:14 am

Mostly the teachers (although some are quite ok).

Linda

Location: Warwick Uni

blueline

IB studying

by ellie on 21 Nov 2007 08:30 pm

HEy! As I only got into IB four months ago, and missed have a year of the Diploma I am pretty immature about everything...

How much do u study and how much u think is neccessary apr.?

Because the fact that soo many fail their Diploma with the background that pretty much only good students do the Diploma anyway is quit frightening though..

I would be very thankful for advices and stuff ...

Thanks!

Elena 


by danloyboy on 24 Nov 2007 10:24 am

From what I've heard...go to school...study...come home...study...repeat forever

danloyboy

blueline

Past papers, are they allowed?

by marie on 18 Aug 2004 08:25 pm

Are we allowed to post them, or will the IB get us for that? I read somewhere that they will because you have to pay for them.

marie

Location: Cambridge, UK


by alia on 19 Aug 2004 03:19 am

I see so many sites with past papers...so I think it's all right. Post away

alia 


by Linda on 19 Aug 2004 06:43 am

The IBO will shut down all sites containing past IB exam papers.

It has done to several I know of (well, four to be exact).

Linda

Location: Warwick Uni


by alia on 19 Aug 2004 01:54 pm

oh wow...Didn't know that!

Maybe if we have past papers saved on our computers, we can send it to each other via AIM?

alia 


by kildare on 19 Aug 2004 08:22 pm

Yea, sending them through AIM or e-mail is a much safer way to go about it.

kildare 

Location: Geneva/Ireland/Oxford


by ash2003 on 22 Aug 2004 11:35 pm

I don't think the IBO has the power to physically shut-down a site containing past papers, but eventually I think they'd get their way.

In the past, they blackmailed a IB student who had a site containing pastpapers by telling him he wouldn't receive his IB diploma until he shut down the site by a certain period of time.

Since you got your diploma, maybe there isn't too much of a risk

So which would it be, stay legal, or do the right thing? hehe, the pressure is on you.

ash2003 

Location: Yokohama yo' mamma


by Me on 10 Nov 2004 06:30 am

Well, I would appreciate if someone sent me past exams in the following subjects:

I think that's about what I could use some in. I have already a couple of physics exams, and mathematics exams.. but it would be good to have them on the computer aswell not only in paper form, and also to have more than I have currenctly, since the syllabus changes now and then, and most of my mathematics HL past papers are from 1997 up to 2000, and not above it. I would really appreciate it!

Me 


by ash on 10 Nov 2004 07:23 am

i'd be delighted to send you them since I did have have each and every one since the syllabus changed to the current one.... but I threw them all away, sorry

I'd rather forget my experience with IB than remember them in the form of past papers, wouldn't you? I think somebody else could help you though.... anyone?

ash 


by alia on 25 Jan 2005 08:23 pm

Does anyone have any past papers for the following courses?:

My mocks are coming up at the end of Feb and I want to dedicate the beginning of Feb to studying.

Thanks!!

alia 


by vien on 01 May 2007 03:40 pm

hi!!..I'm now here..

i'm studying IB in australia at the moment...

and i found psychology, Maths Method SL and Chemistry SL.. quite hard...

i was wondering would it be possible that someone can send me some past papers form that subjuects and also give me some help...

or can add me on msn... thank you!!!

vien 

Location: australia

blueline

Hi ! :D

by anna~ on 23 Feb 2006 06:46 pm

Well, hi everyone! I found this site when I was desperately looking for a topic for my Biology EE, and found it quite helpful and interesting. Decided to join (cause I'm such a nerd...hahaha...j/k j/k), so just wanted to introduce myself and say HI!

anna~

blueline

Extended essay subject

by ibrules on 29 Nov 2005 08:57 pm

I'm thinking of doing my extended essay about the concept of zero and whether or not it is really necessary but I'm not sure that is a math topic. Please help

ibrules

blueline

Thanks for marie... Can you all give me some suggestion....

by sammy on 11 Nov 2005 02:17 pm

Well... first thank you so much for marie. I just wanna ask, based on your experience and knowledge. What are the novels or books that I should read to improve my vocab and grammar???

Thank you so much for your attention and help, I really appreciate it.

sammy 

Location: Jakarta, Indonesia


by marie on 11 Nov 2005 08:32 pm

sammy wrote:

Well... first thank you so much for marie. I just wanna ask, based on your experience and knowledge. What are the novels or books that I should read to improve my vocab and grammar???

Thank you so much for your attention and help, I really appreciate it.

I don't know really! Well, reading the newspaper is actually a good start. Depends on what kind of genre you like.

If you like old novels perhaps books by Jane Austen ('Emma', 'Pride and Prejudice, Emily Bronte ('Wuthering Heights') or Charlotte Bronte ('Jane Eyre') If you are a girl the gentlemen in these books will make you swoon. If you like mystery novels how about some Arthur Conan Doyle (Sherlock Holmes), Agatha Christie (Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple), or PD James? If you like fantasy how about Lord of The Rings? If you want to think about society etc. maybe George Orwell ('Animal Farm', '1984').

Basically look up on the internet (http://www.sparknotes.com) what people study in school and pick a book from there. Just because people study them in school doesn't mean the books are boring! Hehe.

Pick a book that isn't too easy but isn't too difficult to the extent that you give up reading! I must embarrasingly admit that although I have read more 'educated' books *cough*, my favourite books still remain to be the kiddy ones such as 'His Dark Materials' (Trilogy — The Northern Lights, The Subtle Knife, and The Amber Spyglass) and Harry Potter!!! Gotta love the fantasies. Micheal Crichton is a good lazy read too...but perhaps not very vocab improving?!

Anyhow, I'm not helping. I also enjoy reading not just fiction but historical books. They tend to be ace if you find a subject you're really interested in. Over the summer I was very moved by John Krakauer's 'Under The Banner of Heaven: A History of Violent Faith'. Not only did it stretch my vocab slightly, I learnt a hell lot. And oh yes — in eighth grade I read Alex Haley's 'Roots'. It's AMAZING. And it did wonders for my essay writing skills.

The main advice is to choose a book you'll enjoy, not a book you'll have to trudge through just because you want to improve your vocab. Reading should be enjoyable! If you need help with choosing books, librarians are always glad to help!

Love,

Marie

xxxx

marie

Location: Cambridge, UK

blueline

Need advice for my English

by sammy on 10 Nov 2005 10:33 pm

For 1 1/2 years, I always got "4" for my English score in the report card. I don't know why I can't get "5". Whereas, I always try to study hard for the test / essay / presentation, etc. At first, I was thinking maybe the teacher didn't like me. But after I changed teacher, it happened again.

So I need advice from you all for my improvement, because I really like to get mark "5" in my report card. I want to make my parents happy and if I can get "5", my total mark will increase. So with that I can apply in any university.

Thank you for your attention and help, I really appreciate it...

sammy

Location: Jakarta, Indonesia


by marie on 11 Nov 2005 09:31 am

sammy wrote:

For 1 1/2 years, I always got "4" for my English score in the report card. I don't know why I can't get "5". Whereas, I always try to study hard for the test / essay / presentation, etc. At first, I was thinking maybe the teacher didn't like me. But after I changed teacher, it happened again.

So I need advice from you all for my improvement, because I really like to get mark "5" in my report card. I want to make my parents happy and if I can get "5", my total mark will increase. So with that I can apply in any university.

Thank you for your attention and help, I really appreciate it...

Hello Sammy,

Check out the IB English section of the forum for tips on how to do well on the exam.

As for how to improve your English generally, I can only give you well told tips:

• Learn vocab. Having a healthy stock of words always makes your essay look good. I'm not telling you to go overboard here and use words that no one understands. One thing that improved my English grade dramatically was to take the SATs. I learned tons and tons of vocab for that, and you won't believe what wonders it did to my essays.

• Read. When your free, or bedtime reading. Anything you enjoy! But something that is intellectually stimulating, not magazines.

• Ask to see other people's essays. You know who gets those As or 7s, now hunt them down and ask them politely whether you can take a look at their past essays. Hopefully they'll be happy to show you. Observe what parts of their essay helped them get a good grade. Now try those techniques yourself.

If you have any specific IB English questions pertaining to things such as essay techniques and what not, feel free to post them in the English section.

In the past I never was a super duper strong English student, although I did do ok. But after being taught by an amazing teacher I managed to improve, and (if I have the time) I'll be happy to explain the tips she taught me.

marie

Location: Cambridge, UK

blueline

Life after the IB

by Maestroryu on 29 Oct 2005 01:15 am

Hey everyone,

I'm an ex-IB student now studying in the University of Nottingham. I just wanted to give u some advice and my view towards the IB hoping they'll cheer u up or it cud depress u (if it does, sorry!!)

I'll b honest abt it. I was psychologically breaking down when it was about 3 months before the actual exam. I was a step away from becoming clinically depressed and yes I had to take anti-depressants (a light one) to avoid breaking down. It was not the best part of my life. The IB is abt how u can avoid breaking down and last until the end of it. Thats what all my teachers told me.

And this may sound very unmotivating but the actual exam is very unrewarding. U study so so much and cram everything in every part of ur brain but what u get on ur paper in the big examination hall is... abt 25% or even less than what u studied. But Im not saying u dont have to study. Its jst unrewarding and when I finished some of my exams, I actually said WTF? Was that it?? Where was this and that?? But oh well, thats the IB!! So yeah I warn u all, its unrewarding so jst go and party like hell afterwards.

Now the positive stuff. Im now typing up my first essay on bird flu. THE infamous extended essay rox!! 1000 words is nothing. Some of my friends on my course doing the same essay r saying "oh god 1000 words is so long!! How do I write bibliography???" (altho I had to get some help from Marie abt references )

And hey once ur done u can b proud of urself. IB is the worlds most toughest high school diploma apparently. So even if u pass by a point or u get that nasty 45 pts (yeah have some friends who got that) u got the IB diploma and u shud b proud of it. Even if u dont get it, dont think ur a failure. Its jst a diploma, ur still alive and fine it mite make ur life harder but still, ur alive!!!!!!!! I had so many ppl talk to me like as tho failing the IB is failing ur life. ITS NOT!!!!!!!

Anyway this is becoming too long now so I ll shut up.

Hope u guys survive. I'll pop up from time to time so u can ask me abt the IB.

My subjects were:

(Got my 7 in Geo fieldtrip essay, got some gud advice for ya!!)

Maestroryu

blueline

hi everyone, im a new member

by Idiosyncratic on 01 Sep 2005 06:12 am

i fortunately got a chance to talk to marie over MSN and i signed up after she told me about this website.

im from canada, now in my second year of IB.

my courses are:

and at hte moment im wading through my EE due very soon and several IA stuff in biology.

nice to meet you all

Idiosyncratic 


by marie on 01 Sep 2005 08:31 am

Idiosyncratic wrote:

i fortunately got a chance to talk to marie over MSN and i signed up after she told me about this website.

im from canada, now in my second year of IB.

my courses are:

  • A1 English HL
  • A2? Japanese Ab Initio
  • A3 History SL
  • A4 Biology HL + Physics SL
  • A5 Math HL
  • Certificate: Chemistry HL

and at hte moment im wading through my EE due very soon and several IA stuff in biology.

nice to meet you all

Hey! Welcome, welcome

marie

Location: Cambridge, UK

blueline

Prospective IB'er from US

by Guest on 29 Apr 2005 01:41 pm

Hey everyone, my name is Zack and I am currently a freshman (that's the US Ninth Grade age, 14-15) at the Illustrious Baltimore City College High School in Baltimore, Maryland. Right now, I am in IB Spanish III as probably the only ninth grader (I'm fifteen) in the IB program at our school. I don't qute know what that translates into in terms of Standard Level and Higher Level, but that's the course name.

Baltimore City College, or City as it is usually called, is an urban public (that means no tuition) magnet school. In order to get into City, you have to score high on a Standardized test, and they accept about 300 - 400 incoming freshmen every year. The school is in all senses a city school - just like you see in the movies. 97% of the student body is Black, so it makes it intersting as one of the only Jewish kids in the school. 60% of the student body is eligible for welfare and food stamps, and many come from what you would call "the ghetto". Still, City has a graduation rate of 97%, so we are kind of like the diamond of the rough of the Baltimore City Public School System.

I am imagining that many of you came from international schools… not quite City with 400+ students in a grade. Our IB program is a little weak compared to yours, since we don't really have much money to fund it. We also have to offer Standard Baltimore City Public School System classes, so only a portion of the kids are in IB. I wanted to join because I want to get a feeling of what IB is like for other people around the world. We offer all the courses in our little list here : http://www.ibmidatlantic.org/Courses1.htm , but next year we are also getting Film Studies and Physics.

So I just wanted to introduce myself… I will be checking this site a lot, so somebody post QUICK!!

~~ Zack


by baltimore on 29 Apr 2005 01:43 pm

hahah sorry that post was to me. I forgot to log in. I figured Baltimore would be an appropriate nick.

baltimore

Location: Baltimore, Maryland, US


by marie on 29 Apr 2005 04:46 pm

baltimore wrote:

Hey everyone, my name is Zack and I am currently a freshman (that's the US Ninth Grade age, 14-15) at the Illustrious Baltimore City College High School in Baltimore, Maryland. Right now, I am in IB Spanish III as probably the only ninth grader (I'm fifteen) in the IB program at our school. I don't qute know what that translates into in terms of Standard Level and Higher Level, but that's the course name.

Baltimore City College, or City as it is usually called, is an urban public (that means no tuition) magnet school. In order to get into City, you have to score high on a Standardized test, and they accept about 300 - 400 incoming freshmen every year. The school is in all senses a city school - just like you see in the movies. 97% of the student body is Black, so it makes it intersting as one of the only Jewish kids in the school. 60% of the student body is eligible for welfare and food stamps, and many come from what you would call "the ghetto". Still, City has a graduation rate of 97%, so we are kind of like the diamond of the rough of the Baltimore City Public School System.

I am imagining that many of you came from international schools… not quite City with 400+ students in a grade. Our IB program is a little weak compared to yours, since we don't really have much money to fund it. We also have to offer Standard Baltimore City Public School System classes, so only a portion of the kids are in IB. I wanted to join because I want to get a feeling of what IB is like for other people around the world. We offer all the courses in our little list here : http://www.ibmidatlantic.org/Courses1.htm , but next year we are also getting Film Studies and Physics.

So I just wanted to introduce myself… I will be checking this site a lot, so somebody post QUICK!!

~~ Zack

You're a freshman and taking IB? That is very impressive! Thanks for your info on your school, it's very interesting. It is true, most of us are from International Schools, including myself. I went to an International School in Japan, and had 36 kids in my year — and we were the largest graduating class in the school's history!!!

My school doesn't have the massive range of course choices, but I guess it is good. I currently read Psychology at uni, and my high school did not offer that as a choice.

It's very interesting to read about IB in schools in the US

marie

Location: Cambridge, UK


by baltimore on 30 Apr 2005 09:49 am

marie wrote:

You're a freshman and taking IB? That is very impressive! Thanks for your info on your school, it's very interesting. It is true, most of us are from International Schools, including myself. I went to an International School in Japan, and had 36 kids in my year — and we were the largest graduating class in the school's history!!!

My school doesn't have the massive range of course choices, but I guess it is good. I currently read Psychology at uni, and my high school did not offer that as a choice.

It's very interesting to read about IB in schools in the US

Well, you can learn more about our school at www.baltimorecitycollege.net , though I think the site is more catered to a kid here in the city. I would think that most of the US IB schools are indeed public, rather than international. I am sure a good mix of them are private too (that means you pay tuition for them. I once heard the the government school are called private in the UK or something.) .

They have a way of teaching spanish in the US in years. So you start with Spanish I, then the next year Spanish II, then the next year is Spanish III, and so forth usually if you are REALLY good to Spanish V. Now, I came from a middle school which was VERY good at languages, since it was a Jewish school and we had a bilingual program with hebrew until lunch and english until you went home. Adding on another language wasn't a big deal by any means. So when I got to high school, I was ready to go into Spanish III. But I understand you need two years of lang instruction before you go into an IB Language Course, no?

It's interesting that you say your biggest grade was 37, since that's the size of my Biology class alone!! Next year I was supposed to start Meathods, but they are now discontinuing the class in way for making Maths SL and HL, along with Studies. I was going to take Maths SL then, but the finally made the rule that sophomores were no longer allowed to sit for IB Exams (unless you have special cases like me and my spanish).

What were the underclassmen years at your high school like? Were sophomores and freshmen allowed to take IB classes? What classes did you have instead?

~~ Zack

baltimore

Location: Baltimore, Maryland, US


by marie on 02 May 2005 02:02 am

baltimore wrote:

Well, you can learn more about our school at http://www.baltimorecitycollege.net , though I think the site is more catered to a kid here in the city. I would think that most of the US IB schools are indeed public, rather than international. I am sure a good mix of them are private too (that means you pay tuition for them. I once heard the the government school are called private in the UK or something.) .

They have a way of teaching spanish in the US in years. So you start with Spanish I, then the next year Spanish II, then the next year is Spanish III, and so forth usually if you are REALLY good to Spanish V. Now, I came from a middle school which was VERY good at languages, since it was a Jewish school and we had a bilingual program with hebrew until lunch and english until you went home. Adding on another language wasn't a big deal by any means. So when I got to high school, I was ready to go into Spanish III. But I understand you need two years of lang instruction before you go into an IB Language Course, no?

It's interesting that you say your biggest grade was 37, since that's the size of my Biology class alone!! Next year I was supposed to start Meathods, but they are now discontinuing the class in way for making Maths SL and HL, along with Studies. I was going to take Maths SL then, but the finally made the rule that sophomores were no longer allowed to sit for IB Exams (unless you have special cases like me and my spanish).

What were the underclassmen years at your high school like? Were sophomores and freshmen allowed to take IB classes? What classes did you have instead?

~~ Zack

In 10th grade I took IGCSEs, the international version of the British GCSEs. 9th grade was sort of a preparation for that. No 10th graders took IB classes. However, in 10th grade if you were in the higher math class and took the Additional Mathematics exam in 10th grade (the highest exam you can take), then that was the same as taking IB Math Methods. In fact the IGCSE exam was harder.

In 9th grade I think you took all of the basic classes - English, Math, Japanese, French/Spanish, Geography, History, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, PE.

10th grade you could choose between the sciences, and the social studies.

You then started your IB course in 11th grade.

My school is www.yis.ac.jp. I'm actually in two of the pictures, hehehe.

marie

Location: Cambridge, UK


by Linda on 03 May 2005 09:13 pm

Hi, I went to a public school in Norway, which had abut 30 people taking IB I think, and the rest doing the Noregian high school curriculum. Our teachers didnt speak English very well, nor did they all have university education, but some were good. I went to the OSC-IB summer course in Cambridge, and the teachers there were amazing (they hire in teachers from the big international schools).I was so jealous of the people that got to have these teachers all year...

Linda

Location: Warwick Uni


by baltimore on 07 May 2005 10:14 am

That is something I definately like about IB — you can get in touch with schools all around the world. I guess it would be really easy to be a foreign exchange student at an IB school. We have one here from Japan, and it's amazing how much better his English is now from when he came. I guess I could do the same thing if I wanted to, that is go to another school for a bit. Considering that the classes and credits should be the same. I don't think I would to it though, because I would not want to miss all that time away from my friends. I would feel like I am missing out.

What was it like going to an International School? I was once staying in an American School in Saltzburg, and from the kids there I got the feeling that there is a lot of animosity. Bulgarians don't like the Serbs or Italians… English don't like the French… Arabs don't like the Israelis… Koreans don't like the Japanese… all this undue hate going all over the place. Was it really like that? I mean, there are a lot of thing I can't do at my school because I am White and the school is majority black, but it's not at the same level I had seen at the International Schools. Do you guys feel like your experience was like that?

baltimore 

Location: Baltimore, Maryland, US


by marie on 07 May 2005 04:27 pm

baltimore wrote:

That is something I definately like about IB — you can get in touch with schools all around the world. I guess it would be really easy to be a foreign exchange student at an IB school. We have one here from Japan, and it's amazing how much better his English is now from when he came. I guess I could do the same thing if I wanted to, that is go to another school for a bit. Considering that the classes and credits should be the same. I don't think I would to it though, because I would not want to miss all that time away from my friends. I would feel like I am missing out.

What was it like going to an International School? I was once staying in an American School in Saltzburg, and from the kids there I got the feeling that there is a lot of animosity. Bulgarians don't like the Serbs or Italians… English don't like the French… Arabs don't like the Israelis… Koreans don't like the Japanese… all this undue hate going all over the place. Was it really like that? I mean, there are a lot of thing I can't do at my school because I am White and the school is majority black, but it's not at the same level I had seen at the International Schools. Do you guys feel like your experience was like that?

Going to an International School was well, prob like going to any other school. However, there are 'National cliques' as you say. The Japanese grouped together because they spoke Japanese, and the 'non-Japanese' grouped together because a) they felt left out coz they didn't speak Japanese or b) they just felt like they were different. Of course, ppl from different countries mingled all the time though. But no, we didn't have any racism or anything. When I say 'Japanese' though, the full-Japanese people in my class spoke perfect English because they'd attended an International School all of their lives.

I think some non-Japanese ppl who came hated how much ppl 'didn't have a 'social life' and just did school related stuff (eg. studying, sports, fine arts) all the time — I mean studying and getting into a good uni is a HUGE thing in Japan, and it's considered normal to work long hours everyday to get into the school you want.

My school was small, which in hindsight (now I attend a Uni w/ 20,000 ppl), was good — each of us got loads of attention from our teachers, the small classes were good, etc etc. It does get kind of dull though....also the choice of activities were limited.

I think a unique thing about my school is that it's connected from Kindergarden to Highschool — since I joined in the middle of kindergarden I attended my school for 13 years (few ppl 15 years!) so I guess it has a special place in my heart, even though I despised it to bits many times!

marie 

Location: Cambridge, UK

blueline

Using the Moodle

by marie on 22 Aug 2004 05:15 am

I am not an expert myself, but my dad is, so if you have any questions please post them here.

marie 

Location: Cambridge, UK


by Levi on 22 Aug 2004 08:04 am

Ok. My question is what the **** is a moodle??? And how is it supposed to work?

Levi

Location: Cambridge


by marie on 22 Aug 2004 08:15

Levi wrote:

Ok. My question is what the **** is a moodle??? And how is it supposed to work?

Hahahahah very discrete :p This is what the website says:

Moodle is a course management system designed to help educators who want to create quality online courses. The software is used all over the world by universities, schools, companies and independent teachers. Moodle is open source and completely free to use.

Basically if you're an advisor you can make quizzes, labels, lectures, charts, forums, wikis etc. I've already made two quizzes on the English forum so you can check them out (one more to come very soon). Linda and Jonatan have done wonderful jobs on the ToK and Physics moodles respectively.

The difference between the forum and the moodle is that the forum is for questions, tips and advice. The moodle is for step-by-step lessons and quizzes.

Would you like to be an advisor for something?

marie 

Location: Cambridge, UK


by Nowakowski on 22 Aug 2004 03:41 pm

how to post a document (e.g. a quizz) in moodle

Nowakowski 

Location: Edinburgh (Uni) / Poland Gdansk


by admin on 22 Aug 2004 11:24 pm

Nowakowski wrote:

how to post a document (e.g. a quizz) in moodle

If you've been given administrative privileges on the Moodle system, you should see a 'Turn Editing On" button on most pages. Click this button and several new buttons, icons, and links will appear.

Choose the section you want to update and click on the 'Add...' button. You'll see a list of activities and resources. Choose the one you want and then follow the dialogs to setup and modify the activity.

If you're not sure about something, try clicking on the small yellow question mark icons. These provide online help.

Good luck!

admin

Location: North Carolina


by admin on 22 Aug 2004 11:49 pm

Levi wrote:

Ok. My question is what the **** is a moodle??? And how is it supposed to work?

It's a course management system, one of several that have been developed to facilitate online education. Unlike most of the others, which are either commercial or sponsored by educational institutions, Moodle is the work of a single Australian developer, Martin Dougiamas. It's free, it's flexible, and over the last few months it has become the focus of a growing community of international educators.

It contains discussion forums and even chat rooms, but they run far slower than dedicated packages such as phpBB2. That's the reason we decided to split the site into two sections. phpBB2 is for discussions and Moodle is for other activities. The downside of this split is that some resources will inevitably be duplicated. If this becomes a problem we can think about modifying the structure of the site.

For example, if some document files prove particularly popular, it might make sense to post them as regular web pages at the top level of the site.

admin

Location: North Carolina


by Levi on 23 Aug 2004 02:29 am

marie wrote:

Would you like to be an advisor for something?

Maybe - I'll browse around them and see what they are like first and then get back to you. BTW, thanks a lot for the explanation, the whole moodle thing had me very confused

Levi

Location: Cambridge


by Splenda620 on 12 Mar 2005 06:19 pm

The moodle seems very incomplete, I see nothing on the Psychology page, Math Studies page, EE page, Biology page, and all non-english languages are grouped into one big subject? How does this help?

Splenda620


by marie on 13 Mar 2005 08:39 am

Splenda620 wrote:

The moodle seems very incomplete, I see nothing on the Psychology page, Math Studies page, EE page, Biology page, and all non-english languages are grouped into one big subject? How does this help?

It is incomplete because a) We don't have enough people working on it (eg. none of the moderators have done psychology). b) All of the people who have volunteered to make this page are now at uni working hard for their degree. Please understand. This site is run by ex-IBers who have spared their time to write advice.

marie 

Location: Cambridge, UK


by moi16lynn on 18 Mar 2005 01:50 pm

The only thing that I have to say, is that I'm finding it great that you all are doing work for us. Not many people do so. The website is a great idea, but this needs time.

In my own school I have advertised you and most of the students who checked it out, were finding it a great website. We are now still in grade 10, but we are sure we are going to use the website very often.

Keep patient people, I'm sure that within months this website will become great!!!

!!>Mazzel<!!

moi16lynn 

blueline

When and How to Spread the Word?

by marie on 14 Aug 2004 07:02 am

We've been working hard on this site, and it'll be wonderful to get ppl to read what we've written.

My best friend mentioned this site on a livejournal ring and quite a few ppl joined Viewing this success I'm planning on mentioning it on a few more rings, but not now as school has not started — we don't want people joining and forgetting about it.

Levi has kindly offered to mention this site to his old school's IB-Coordinator and to his Vice-Principal.

Anyone else have any suggestions on how to spread the word?

When do most schools start? My old school starts on the 23rd. If you are an IB student when do you think you will be in need of this site?

marie 

Location: Cambridge, UK


by Linda on 15 Aug 2004 06:56 am

Schools starts on Monday in Norway, I'd be happy to e-mail the IB-coorinators in the 4 IB schools we have here in Norway, encourraging them to give this web address to their students.

Linda 

Location: Warwick Uni


by marie on 15 Aug 2004 06:58 am

Linda wrote:

Schools starts on Monday in Norway, I'd be happy to e-mail the IB-coorinators in the 4 IB schools we have here in Norway, encourraging them to give this web address to their students.

Really? Thanks that would be absolutely lovely

Totally changing the subject, as for the ToK moodle, I apologize for the delay, i've slightly forgotten how to do it so i'll be reading the instruction manual again (doh).

marie 

Location: Cambridge, UK


by Levi on 15 Aug 2004 09:56 am

Maybe we should draft an e-mail to send off to various IB coordinators at major schools such as Geneva, Vienna, etc. I would be happy to undertake this, though equally if anyone has the time or desire to do so feel free to preempt any of my attempts

Levi

Location: Cambridge


by Nowakowski on 15 Aug 2004 05:14 pm

I'll place posters on the information tables in my school, but the school year starts on 1 Sep, so there's still some time left.

Nowakowski

Location: Edinburgh (Uni) / Poland Gdansk


by ManutdGurl on 15 Aug 2004 07:08 pm

Levi wrote:

Maybe we should draft an e-mail to send off to various IB coordinators at major schools such as Geneva, Viena, etc. I would be happy to undertake this, though equally if anyone has the time or desire to do so feel free to preempt any of my attempts

I graduated from the International School in Vienna, so I would be happy to spread the word there. School starts on the 25.08...soon actually!!

ManutdGurl

Location: austria / warwick uni


by marie on 15 Aug 2004 08:10 pm

Levi wrote:

Maybe we should draft an e-mail to send off to various IB coordinators at major schools such as Geneva, Viena, etc. I would be happy to undertake this, though equally if anyone has the time or desire to do so feel free to preempt any of my attempts

I've got LOADS of time on my hands so i'd be happy to help!!

marie 

Location: Cambridge, UK


by alia on 19 Aug 2004 08:55 pm

I could post an ad on our school newspaper...[now that I'm the chief editor ]

alia 


by alia on 19 Aug 2004 09:03 pm

alia wrote:

I could post an ad on our school newspaper...[now that I'm the chief editor ]

You're chief editor now!!! Congrats, I knew you'd get it That would be lovely.....but VERY embarrassing? The English teachers would so make fun of me Hahahaha. Maybe for now i'd feel more comfortable if it spread word for word through ppl who really want to do IB.

marie 

Location: Cambridge, UK


by alia on 19 Aug 2004 09:50 pm

Hehe all right. Shall spread it around by word!

alia


 by Guest on 14 Sep 2004 05:00 pm

ManutdGurl wrote:

Levi wrote:

Maybe we should draft an e-mail to send off to various IB coordinators at major schools such as Geneva, Viena, etc. I would be happy to undertake this, though equally if anyone has the time or desire to do so feel free to preempt any of my attempts

actually, thats a great idea.. if this is a official IB site. Is this? or is this unofficial?

Guest


by admin on 14 Sep 2004 11:55 pm

Anonymous wrote:

actually, thats a great idea.. if this is a official IB site. Is this? or is this unofficial?

[Answering for Marie, who's offline for a few days] The IB Resource is unofficial. It's run by volunteers for the benefit of anyone taking, or interested in, the IB programme.

admin

Location: North Carolina


by Quidam on 15 Sep 2004 11:22

Quidam wrote:

admin wrote:

Anonymous wrote:

actually, thats a great idea.. if this is a official IB site. Is this? or is this unofficial?

[Answering for Marie, who's offline for a few days] The IB Resource is unofficial. It's run by volunteers for the benefit of anyone taking, or interested in, the IB programme.

then please state in the index page that this is a unofficial ib help site, so people dont get confused.

Quidam


by Levi on 22 Sep 2004 01:47 am

then please state in the index page that this is a unofficial ib help site, so people dont get confused.

Surely this is fairly clear anyways. The IB logo is displayed nowhere. Besides all the IB related pages are .org, not .com.

Levi

Location: Cambridge


by Guest on 02 Oct 2004 12:33 pm

Levi wrote:

then please state in the index page that this is a unofficial ib help site, so people dont get confused.

Surely this is fairly clear anyways. The IB logo is displayed nowhere. Besides all the IB related pages are .org, not .com.

tho maybe people dont know that? and the address gives a idea of what site it is

Guest 


by ash2003 on 06 Oct 2004 11:50 pm

no.. I think it's fairly obvious that this is unofficial!

The only thing that could possibly suggest it being official is the fact that it has it's own domain name unlike a amateur page hosted on geocities or such free sites.

ash2003

Location: Yokohama yo' mamma