Moodle  : English

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Literary Term Quiz

Agon

  • A dialogue or confrontation between the major characters in Greek tragedy.
  • The concept or attitude that man's position in the world is essentially comical, pointless or ludicrous pervades the theatre of the absurd.
  • Division of a play.
  • Story in which the characters are abstracts, symbols or personifications.

Alliteration

  • A metaphor where the point of comparison is expanded beyond one simple connection
  • Slippery word which can refer simply to drama or can imply a situation which is full of excitement or tension.
  • Uses the same sound at the beginnings of words which are close together
  • The storyline of a play or novel.

Ambiguity

  • Double meaning either as a humorous device, or to enrich meaning, or to reflect the complexity of life; vagueness in meaning, or the possibility of having more than one meaning.
  • A character who develops or changes during the course of a literary work.
  • When a word within a line of poetry rhymes with the word at the end.
  • Long narrative poetry dealing with the deeds of heroes

Anaphora

  • A mimed performance which usually prepares the audience for the main action which is to follow.
  • Special kind of repetition where the words or phrase beginning several lines in poetry or units in prose are repeated.
  • When a word within a line of poetry rhymes with the word at the end.
  • A monosyllabic rhyme.

Anecdote

  • Virulent form of satire.
  • A metrical foot of two stressed syllables which is used to vary other feet, such as iambs or trochees
  • section of eight lines in a sonnet.
  • A brief story usually based on a personal experience.

Anecdote

  • Virulent form of satire.
  • A metrical foot of two stressed syllables which is used to vary other feet, such as iambs or trochees
  • A section of eight lines in a sonnet.
  • A brief story usually based on a personal experience.

Anticlimax

  • A deflation or disappointment after expectations have been raised.
  • When a word within a line of poetry rhymes with the word at the end
  • The regular pattern of accented and unaccented syllables, like the beat in music.
  • A character who does not change or develop in the course of the work

Antithesis

  • Opposition, or contrast of ideas or words in a balanced or parallel construction.
  • When a word within a line of poetry rhymes with the word at the end.
  • A monosyllabic rhyme.
  • A word or sentence which reads the same backwards and forwards.

Apostrophe

  • Lines in poetry where the full stop does not come at the end of the line and the sentence continues on the next line.
  • The peak of tension.
  • A poem or speech to a dead or absent person, to an abstract or a personification.
  • Spoken by an actor who is alone on stage, and speaks his or her thoughts aloud.

Archetype

  • A metrical foot of two stressed syllables which is used to vary other feet, such as iambs or trochees.
  • A rhyme that is not true.
  • A universal and timeless image, symbol or story pattern.
  • Story which seeks to teach a moral or message.

Assonance

  • A dialogue or confrontation between the major characters in Greek tragedy.
  • Elaborate form of alliteration where two or more consonant sounds per word repeat.
  • The repetition of identical or similar vowel sounds, especially in stressed syllables, with changes in the intervening consonants.
  • A metaphor where the point of comparison is expanded beyond one simple connection.

Bathos

  • A poem where the first letter of each line spells a word when read vertically.
  • A type of poem which wistfully encourages the young to make the best of their youth and beauty.
  • The hero of the above type of narrative poetry.
  • A form of anticlimax which always has a humorous effect.

Colloquial

  • Term used for the main character in a play
  • Describing everyday conversational language rather than the formal language of essays or literature.
  • More a psychological term than a literary one, this refers to what causes a character to carry out particular actions.
  • Poem or speech giving praise.

Consonance

  • Elaborate form of alliteration where two or more consonant sounds per word repeat.
  • The method by which an author conveys a sense of personality.
  • Adjective or adjectival cluster that is associated with a particular person or thing and that usually seems to capture their prominent characteristics.
  • Uses the same sound at the beginnings of words which are close together.

Didactic

  • A clash or mismatch; putting things together which do not suit.
  • A truism or pithy remark; a brief witty comment on human nature.
  • Clumsy, trivial verse or loose, irregular measure.
  • Written in a tone intending to instruct.

Double entendre

  • Suggestive ambiguity or double meaning.
  • A mimed performance which usually prepares the audience for the main action which is to follow.
  • A phrase which is so overused that it has lost all imaginative impact.
  • A form of poetry which uses rhythm but not rhyme.

Enjambment

  • The omission of letters or words whose absence does not prevent the reader from understanding.
  • Traditional story or tale, springing from oral tradition.
  • A line which ends before the sentence does and so the reader must carry on to the next line without a pause to find the sense.
  • Poem about rural life and farming.

Enumeration

  • Virulent form of satire.
  • Another word for exaggeration.
  • Letters which create a hissing sound.
  • Listing.

Eulogy

  • Novel constructed from letters exchanged by the various characters.
  • Exaggeration for emphasis or other rhetorical effect.
  • Poem or speech giving praise.
  • Type of play including music and dance, often a courtly entertainment involving mythical or allegorical figures with sumptuous costumes.

Euphemism

  • Story which seeks to teach a moral or message.
  • A mimed performance which usually prepares the audience for the main action which is to follow.
  • A word or phrase used as a polite substitute for something unpleasant.
  • A metaphor which is so overused that it has lost all imaginative impact.

Extended metaphor

  • A metaphor which is so overused that it has lost all imaginative impact.
  • Imagery, any poetic devices which appeal to the imagination such as metaphor, simile etc.
  • A metaphor where the point of comparison is expanded beyond one simple connection.
  • Common figurative device in which one thing is described imaginatively in terms of another.

Georgic

  • Poetry which rejects restrictions of meter, rhythm and line length.
  • Metrical foot consisting of one unstressed and one stressed syllable.
  • Either a picture summoned up in one's mind or an example of a simile or a metaphor.
  • A poem about rural life and farming.

Hyperbole

  • Exaggeration for emphasis or other rhetorical effect.
  • Uncountable noun which cannot be made plural which means figurative language.
  • The misuse of polysyllabic words which produces amusing nonsense or the mistaken use of one word which sounds similar to the one actually intended.
  • A monosyllabic rhyme.

In medias res

  • Means in the beginning of things — a sudden start to a poem or story.
  • Poetry which rejects restrictions of meter, rhythm and line length.
  • Either a pastoral poem about shepherds and the ideal world of the countryside or a brief epic that depicts a heroic episode.
  • asic element of a poem.

Incongruity

  • A clash or mismatch; putting things together which do not suit.
  • Attempting to identify causes.
  • The opening part of a play where the character(s) introduce the situation of the play.
  • A metaphor where the point of comparison is expanded beyond one simple connection.

Juxtaposition

  • Literally meaning placing next to.
  • Existing words joined together to force the reader to see something familiar in a new light.
  • The shape or structure of a work.
  • The world or universe, containing many smaller cosmic bodies.

Metaphor

  • Type of play including music and dance, often a courtly entertainment involving mythical or allegorical figures with sumptuous costumes.
  • Common figurative device in which one thing is described imaginatively in terms of another.
  • Type of poem originally written to commemorate some momentous occasion, stately in tone and style.
  • A statement which appears nonsensical, absurd or contradictory but on further inspection in fact makes sense.

Onomatopoeia

  • Suggestive ambiguity or double meaning.
  • Use of words which imitate the sound they mean e.g. splash, rustle, clatter, bang, crunch.
  • A veering away from the main topic of discussion.
  • A character who develops or changes during the course of a literary work.

Overstatement

  • Use of words which imitate the sound they mean.
  • Message or meaning which is often made explicit at the end of a story as in Aesop?s fables.
  • A kind of metaphor in which a thing is replaced by an aspect or attribute of it.
  • Another word for exaggeration.

Oxymoron

  • A figure of speech in which opposite ideas are combined.
  • An archetypal theme in literature that passionate love brings death for the lovers.
  • Humorous poem containing five lines and rhyming AABBA.
  • Type of poem originally written to commemorate some momentous occasion, stately in tone and style.

Paradox

  • Type of poem originally written to commemorate some momentous occasion, stately in tone and style.
  • A statement which appears nonsensical, absurd or contradictory but on further inspection in fact makes sense.
  • The unvoiced thoughts of a character in a novel
  • Existing words joined together to force the reader to see something familiar in a new light

Paradox

  • A work which gives a close imitation of  the style, tone, theme etc of another author in order to mock the original.
  • Uncountable noun which cannot be made plural which means figurative language.
  • A statement which appears nonsensical, absurd or contradictory but on further inspection in fact makes sense.
  • A clash or mismatch; putting things together which do not suit.

Personification

  • A figure of speech in which inanimate objects or abstractions are endowed with human qualities or are represented as possessing human form.
  • The concept or attitude that man's position in the world is essentially comical, pointless or ludicrous pervades the theatre of the absurd.
  • A dialogue or confrontation between the major characters in Greek tragedy.
  • The inclusion of something which does not belong in the historical period of the work.

Plosive

  • Term from phonetics which describes the way the letters B and P are formed (by exploding the lips).
  • Rhythm intended to be close to natural speech.
  • Group of six lines in a sonnet.
  • The secondary story line.

Rhetorical Question

  • The opening stages of a play leading up to the climax.
  • A question that does not expect an answer.
  • Lines in poetry where the full stop does not come at the end of the line and the sentence continues on the next line.
  • Spoken by an actor who is alone on stage, and speaks his or her thoughts aloud.

Sibilant

  • Applied to nouns which refer to ideas and concepts such as brotherhood, justice.
  • Letters which create a hissing sound (s, sh, f etc).
  • A form of anticlimax which always has a humorous effect.
  • Speech made by an actor to the audience, with other characters on stage who do not hear his or her words.

Simile

  • Common figurative device in which one thing is described imaginatively in terms of another.
  • Imaginative comparison which uses as, like or than.
  • Exaggeration for emphasis or other rhetorical effect.
  • Suggestive ambiguity or double meaning.

Stereotype

  • A person that represents a fixed set of ideas (wrongly) believed to be shared by all people of a group.
  • A character who does not change or develop in the course of the work.
  • A character who belongs to an established theatrical type.
  • The literary art of diminishing a subject by making it ridiculous: mockery of vice or folly.

Symbolism

  • The yoking of a word to two other words which have different standing.
  • Letters which create a hissing sound (s, sh, f etc).
  • A rhyme that is not true.
  • The practice of representing things by means of symbols or of attributing symbolic meanings or significance to objects, events, or relationships.

Synecdoche

  • An event or incident or section of a narrative work.
  • Meaning by association which is evoked by a word, as opposed to the literal sense of a word or its strict dictionary definition which is called its denotation.
  • A kind of image or metaphor where substitution of a significant part of something for the thing itself.
  • The juxtaposition of differing or opposite ideas, images, characters.

Tactile imagery

  • Imagery, any poetic devices which appeal to the imagination such as metaphor, simile etc.
  • Uncountable noun which cannot be made plural which means figurative language: i.e. metaphors, similes, personification and so on.
  • Traditional story or tale, springing from oral tradition.
  • Imagery which appeals to the sense of touch.

Literary Techniques Quiz

1. State the literary technique(s) used in this extract:

'When my mother died I was very young,
And my father sold me while yet my tongue
Could scarcely cry 'weep! 'weep! 'weep! 'weep!
So your chimneys I sweep, and in soot I sleep.'

William Blake, 'The Chimney Sweeper' from 'Songs of Innocence'

Answer:

2. State the literary technique(s) used in this extract:

Antigone:

'No funeral hymn; no marriage music;
No sun from this day forth, no light,
No friend to weep at my departing.'

Euripides, 'Antigone'

Answer:

3. State the literary technique(s) used in this extract:

'Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.'

Wilfred Owen, 'Dulce Et Decorum Est'

Answer:

4. State the literary technique(s) used in this extract:

'The buzz saw snarled and rattled in the yard
And made dust and dropped stove-length sticks of wood,
Sweet-scented stuff when the breeze drew across it.
And from there those that lifted eyes could count
Five mountain ranges one behind the other
Under the sunset far into Vermont.'

Robert Frost, 'Out, Out'

Answer:

5. State the literary technique(s) used in the extract:

'I wonder by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved ? were we not wean'd till then ?
But suck'd on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers' den?
'Twas so ; but this, all pleasures fancies be;
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, 'twas but a dream of thee.'

John Donne, 'The Good Morrow'

Answer:

6. What is the literarty technique used in these two different lines from 'Romeo and Juliet' by William Shakespeare?

Juliet: 'My only love sprung from my only hate'
Romeo: 'O brawling love, O loving hate.'

Answer:

7. State the literary technique(s) used in this extract:

'Sudden successive flights of bullets streak the silence.
Less deadly than the air that shudders black with snow,'

Wilfred Owen, 'Exposure'

Answer: